Baseball Swing RSS

Ted Williams wrote about the concept of swinging with a slight uppercut to your swing in 1970.  It didn't really help anyone then and it won't help anyone now. This trend of "new school" hitting coaches touting the importance of swinging up more stems from the advent of launch angle monitors in baseball.  Here is one such example of what I'm talking about, but there are endless examples of this on the internet.  Regardless of where it comes from, IT WON'T HELP YOU HIT BETTER.   What matters when it comes to consistency in baseball is a system working in the...

Read more

What if I told you there is one, easy-to-see, easy-to-feel trait that separates the great swings from the good ones.  And that if you incorporate this one single trait into your swing, your swing will instantly become great.  And the more you move toward this feeling, the better the results will get over time. Too good to be true?  It may seem that way.  I imagine Steve Jobs's neighbors thought it was too good to be true when he started Apple Computers in his garage and talked about how big it was going to be.  Not saying I'm Steve Jobs.  But I am...

Read more

  It has been assumed for a long time that the pop that great hitters have can be attributed to their ability to snap their wrists at contact.  But the true source of pop is invisible with the naked eye.  To see it, you have to slow down the video of the swing.  When you do, you will see that the great hitters have more "forward bend" of the bat just prior to making contact.  In other words, the bat is actually whipping forward through contact.  In the swings of poorer hitters, the bat doesn't bend forward as much and may...

Read more

    It's important to know the history of a teaching so you locate yourself within the "story," and properly move past the misunderstandings that exist within the current paradigm.  Right now we are in a period of swing instruction where the "old school" style of teaching is all but dead, and the "new school" style is the popular way.  In this video, I explain what the old school and new school methods are, how they developed, and why both have major flaws that are effecting your performance at the plate. You may recognize the old school and new school...

Read more

With the recent death of Hank Aaron, it got me thinking about the best pound for pound hitters of all time.  Most people don’t realize that as prodigious a home run hitter as Hank was, he was also, at 6 feet tall and 180 pounds, not a very big guy.  Derek Jeter had three inches and fifteen pounds on Aaron.  Pete Rose had twelve pounds on him.    And yet, as great as these two were, they didn’t even come close to being on Aaron's level.  The difference was in the consistency with which they hit home runs.  Jeter hit a home...

Read more