The Similarities of the Mechanics of the Greatest Hitters and the Greatest Jump Shooters

The Similarities of the Mechanics of the Greatest Hitters and the Greatest Jump Shooters

You see waves in the most efficient of nature's movements.  Birds, snakes, fish, the list goes on.  The same is true of the greatest athletes performing the greatest movements.  The mechanics of the best jump shooters and the best hitters are very similar.  First of all, they both use a three waves system, not a one wave system as is taught by conventional instruction.  Second, they both have a non-dominant hand that supports, and concedes power to the dominant hand.  

In figuring out the baseball swing, inside and out, I am now able to see similar flaws in all sports - the teaching of the most valuable movements are seen too simplistically.  They all assume a one wave system.  This doesn't allow for optimal power and consistency to be generated from the movement.  Watch the video to understand exactly how a three wave system is superior to one, and how in the future movements will be understood in this way and will improve the overall performance of athletes.  

One of the biggest messages I have about movement that no one else is saying is that there are movements that are far and away more valuable than any other movement in the sport, and they must be respected therefore more than any other movement.  Since no instructors before me have been able to figure out movements, they act as if all movements are of the same import.  They only do this because they don't know how to teach the hyper important movements and so they act as if they aren't hyper important and that all movements are equal.  In the future, athletes and coaches will see sports as being dominated by one or two main movements (in baseball it is the pitch and the swing) and they will focus on perfecting those movements above all others.


Leave a comment